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Tax Deductions Every Small Business Owner (in Canada) Should Know About



Understanding tax deductions is crucial for small business owners in Canada. By claiming eligible deductions, you can significantly reduce your taxable income and, consequently, your tax liability. This post aims to outline key tax deductions that Canadian small businesses should be aware of in order to maximize their financial benefits. It is important to note that while this post provides general information, it is always best to consult a tax professional for personalized advice tailored to your specific circumstances.


Business Expenses


Deductible business expenses are costs incurred in the course of operating your business that can be deducted from your taxable income. To be deductible, expenses must be both necessary and reasonable in the context of your business. Additionally, the costs incurred must be related to producing income.


General Rules for Claiming Business Expenses

To claim business expenses, you must keep accurate records and supporting documentation (e.g., receipts, invoices) for all deductions. It is essential to separate personal and business expenses, as only business-related costs are deductible.


Examples of Deductible Business Expenses

  • Rent and utilities: If you rent or lease a space for your business, you can deduct the cost of rent and utilities (e.g., electricity, gas, water).

  • Office supplies and equipment: Supplies and equipment used for business purposes (e.g., stationery, computers, furniture) are deductible.

  • Advertising and marketing: The cost of advertising and marketing your business (e.g., online ads, print materials, radio spots) can be deducted.

  • Professional fees: Fees paid to professionals such as lawyers, accountants, or consultants for business-related services are deductible.

  • Insurance premiums: Premiums paid for business insurance policies (e.g., liability, property, business interruption) can be deducted.

Home Office Expenses


Criteria for Claiming Home Office Expenses

If you operate your business from home and meet certain criteria (e.g., your home office is your principal place of business, or you use the space exclusively for business purposes and regularly meet clients there), you may be eligible to claim home office expenses.


Examples of Deductible Home Office Expenses

  • Mortgage interest or rent: A portion of your mortgage interest or rent, based on the percentage of your home used for business purposes, can be deducted.

  • Property taxes: Similarly, a portion of your property taxes can be deducted based on the business-use percentage of your home.

  • Utilities: A portion of utility costs (e.g., electricity, heating, water) can be deducted, again based on the percentage of your home used for business purposes.

  • Home maintenance and repairs: Expenses for maintaining and repairing the portion of your home used for business purposes can be deducted.

Vehicle Expenses

Criteria for Claiming Vehicle Expenses

If you use your personal vehicle for business purposes, you may be eligible to claim vehicle expenses. It is essential to keep a logbook documenting your business-related trips, including dates, destinations, and distances travelled (our recommendation: use an app for tracking, such as MileIQ)


Examples of Deductible Vehicle Expenses

  • Fuel and oil: A portion of your fuel and oil costs, based on the percentage of kilometres driven for business purposes, can be deducted.

  • Maintenance and repairs: Expenses for maintaining and repairing your vehicle, again based on the business-use percentage, can be deducted.

  • Insurance premiums: A portion of your vehicle insurance premiums can be deducted based on the business-use percentage.

  • License and registration fees: A portion of your license and registration fees can be deducted, based on the percentage of business use.

  • Lease payments or depreciation: If you lease your vehicle, a portion of your lease payments can be deducted. If you own your vehicle, you may be eligible to claim depreciation (known as Capital Cost Allowance) based on the business-use percentage.

Salaries and Wages

Criteria for Claiming Salaries and Wages as Deductions

Salaries and wages paid to employees for work performed for your business are deductible expenses. It is essential to withhold and remit payroll taxes, such as income tax, employment insurance premiums, and Canada Pension Plan contributions, as required by law.


Examples of Deductible Payroll Expenses

  • Gross salaries and wages: The total amount paid to employees before deductions (e.g., income tax, employment insurance) can be deducted.

  • Employer contributions to employment insurance and the Canada Pension Plan: Your share of employment insurance premiums and Canada Pension Plan contributions can be deducted.

  • Employee benefits: Expenses related to employee benefits (e.g., health insurance, retirement plans) can be deducted.

Travel and Entertainment Expenses

Criteria for Claiming Travel and Entertainment Expenses

Travel and entertainment expenses incurred for business purposes can be deducted, subject to certain limitations. It is essential to keep records and documentation (e.g., receipts, invoices) to support these deductions.


Examples of Deductible Travel and Entertainment Expenses

  • Transportation: Expenses related to transportation (e.g., airfare, train tickets, car rentals) for business trips can be deducted.

  • Accommodation: Costs for accommodations (e.g., hotel rooms, Airbnb) for business trips can be deducted.

  • Meals and entertainment: Meals and entertainment expenses incurred while travelling for business or entertaining clients can be deducted, subject to a 50% limitation.

Capital Cost Allowance (CCA)

Definition of CCA and Eligible Assets

Capital Cost Allowance (CCA) is a tax deduction that allows businesses to claim depreciation on certain capital assets, such as buildings, machinery, equipment, and vehicles, over a specified period.


General Rules for Claiming CCA

To claim CCA, you must keep accurate records and documentation (e.g., purchase receipts, sales invoices) for eligible assets. The CCA deduction is based on the cost of the asset and its expected useful life, as determined by the Canada Revenue Agency.

Examples of Assets Eligible for CCA

  • Buildings: Commercial buildings and structures used for business purposes can be depreciated using CCA.

  • Machinery and equipment: Machinery, equipment, and tools used in your business are eligible for CCA.

  • Vehicles: Business vehicles, including passenger vehicles, trucks, and vans, can be depreciated using CCA.

  • Computer software: Certain computer software used for business purposes can be depreciated using CCA.


In conclusion, understanding and claiming tax deductions is essential for small business owners in Canada. By maximizing deductions, you can reduce your taxable income and potentially save a significant amount of money. It is crucial to maintain accurate records and documentation to support your deductions and consult with a tax professional for personalized advice and guidance. By staying informed and proactive about tax deductions, you can better manage your business finances and ensure your company's long-term success.


As always, if you want to discuss with a CPA, please click on here and we would be happy to chat and help you with your business needs.



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